Beaphar Worming Syrup puppies and kittens

Beaphar Worming Syrup puppies and kittens

Regular price £5.65 Sale

45ml

Beaphar Worming Syrup is a chocolate flavoured syrup for the safe and effective treatment of roundworms in puppies and kittens from 2 weeks old. Multi-use pack, suitable for treating whole litters and their mothers. Also suitable for older pets that do not like to take tablets. Supplied in easy-to-use pump dispenser. Can be given directly into the mouth, or mixed with milk or a little food. UK authorised veterinary medicinal product.

Active Ingredient: Worming Syrup is an oral solution containing piperazine citrate 9.4% w/v.

Weigh your pet before treatment to accurately establish the correct dosage.  You can do this by weighing yourself, and repeating whilst holding your pet, on the bathroom scales.  The difference is the weight of the pet.

Worming Syrup may be given directly into the corner of the mouth, or mixed in a little food.  The remainder of the meal should be given afterwards, to ensure all syrup is taken. Shake the bottle before use.  Remove lid and fit dispensing pump.  Prime the pump by slowly depressing the plunger 5 times. 

Once primed, each ‘pump’ depression administers sufficient syrup for 0.9kg bodyweight. For every additional 0.9kg of bodyweight, an extra single pump volume should be administered. The majority of puppies are born with worms, and kittens can become infected while suckling from mum. Therefore, puppies and kittens should be treated for roundworms at 2 weeks of age.  They should be retreated at 4, 6,8,10 and 12 weeks old, and thereafter at 2-3 monthly intervals. Adult cats and dogs should be treated at 3 monthly intervals.  Nursing females should be wormed at the same time, and as frequently, as their puppies and kittens, until weaning. 

Use medicines responsibly; www.noah.co.uk

Storage: Keep out of the reach of children. Do not store above 25oC. Retain all packaging until all of the medicines has been used. Dispose of used packaging and any unused product in the household rubbish.

Warnings: Do not repeat treatment if vomiting occurs shortly after dosing. Consult a Veterinary Surgeon before treating pregnant animals or those with a history of epilepsy or severe renal dysfunction. If signs of disease persist or appear, consult your Veterinary Surgeon. Wash hands and exposed skin after use. Following accidental skin or eye contact, wash the affected area with plenty of water. If irritation persists, seek medical advice. Following accidental ingestion, drink plenty of water and seek medical attention.

FAQs

Q My cat has been sick after worming - what should I do?
A Sometimes cats are sick after taking tablets or medication.  Like humans, some animals have sensitivities to medications which are not evident until they take them for the first time. If your cat is sick immediately after taking a worming treatment, it is probable that the worming treatment will not have been absorbed into its system, and will need to be repeated in a couple of days when its tummy has settled done.  If this happens, provide fresh water and keep and eye on the animal in cvase its condition deteriorates.  If vomiting persists or your pet seems to be in distress, we advise contacting your vet. Take the product packaging with you, so that your vet can see what you have been using.  If you find one type of treatment is unsuitable for you own pet, Beaphar have a range of worming solutions which can offer an alternative.  

 

Q My dog has been sick after worming - what should I do?
A Sometimes dogs are sick after taking tablets or medication, and we often recommend administering with a little food to reduce the chance of this happening.  If your dog is sick immediately afterwards, it is probable that the worming treatment will not have been absorbed into the dog's system, and will need to be repeated in a couple of days time when its tummy has settled again.  If this happens, provide fresh drinking water and keep and eye on the animal to ensure its condition does not deteriorate.  If vomiting persists or your pet seems to be in distress, we  advise contacting your vet. Take the product packaging with you, so that your vet can see what you have been using. Like humans, some animals have sensitivities to medications which are not evident until they take them for the first time.  If you find one type of treatment is unsuitable for your own pet, Beaphar have a range of worming solutions which can offer an alternative.  

 

Q My vet says pet shop wormers do not work - is this true?
A By law, all pet medicines have to pass stringent testing to prove effectiveness, quality and safety before they make it to market.  Indeed, to be allowed to be sold "over the counter", products have to have a long and robust safety record. Newly discovered medicines have to be sold by vets for at least 5 years before they can be assessed to see if they are considered sufficiently safe to be sold without professional supervision, so vets do often supply different products to retailers, some of which work in different ways. However, all pet medicines, no matter whether they are sold by vets, pharmacists or retailers, go through the same testing requirements to prove that they are safe for the pet, their owner and the environment, that they are effective, and that the manufacturer can consistantly make them to the required standard.  All Beaphar wormers have been proven effective and to "do what it says on the pack". If you are unsure or concerned about the most suitable product for your pet,  please feel free to contact our customer care team who can guide you in the right direction.

 

Q Does my cat have worms?
A Most cats become infected with worms soon after birth, and they encounter new sources of infection every time they go out and about, so the answer is probably "yes".  Symptoms of worms may include: a dull coat, a lack of energy, diarrhoea, vomiting (sometimes bringing up a whole worm), weight loss, abdominal swelling, pain, dragging their bottoms on the floor (itching), coughing, shortness of breath and even visible worms in their poo. However, many adult cats have symptomless infections, so don't assume that your pet is worm-free if there are no obvious external signs. It is probable that they do have a low level of infection (as it is difficult to avoid), causing reinfection of themselves, other pets, and children.  Regular treatment is now low cost and easy to administer. Beaphar has a wide range of high quality, easy to administer treatments in a variety of dosing styles to suit every pet.

 

Q Does my dog have worms?
A Most dogs are born with worms, and they encounter new sources of infection every time they go for a walk, so the answer is probably "yes".  Symptoms of worms may include: a dull coat, a lack of energy, diarrhoea, vomiting, weight loss, abdominal swelling, pain, dragging their bottoms on the floor (itching), coughing, shortness of breath and even visible worms in their poo. However, many adult dogs have symptomless infections, so don't assume that your pet is worm-free if there are no obvious external signs. It is probable that they do have a low level of infection (as it is difficult to avoid), causing reinfection of themselves, other pets, and children.  Regular treatment is now low cost and easy to administer. Beaphar has a wide range of high quality, easy to administer treatments in a variety of dosing styles to suit every pet.

 

Q What is the difference between toxocariasis and toxoplasmosis?
A Toxocariasis is an aquired disease which occurs when roundworm eggs (Toxocara) are injested by humans from cat or dog feaces.  The eggs travel to the stomach and intestines where larvae hatch out of them and start to migrate around the body.  Symptoms may include abdominal pain, coughing, headaches and sight impairment, but, more commonly, an infection is without symptoms.  A suspected infection should be diagnosed and treated by your GP. Toxoplasmosis is similarly contracted from cat faeaces but iscaused by a different parasite (Toxoplasma gondii)  This is particularly dangerous for pregnant women as untreated it can lead to severe birth defects (including blindness and brain damage) or miscarriage.  In others, mild flu-like symptoms (high temperature, aching muscles and sore throat) may be exhibited.  Normally, medicinal treatment is not required unless the condition is severe or in a pregnant women.  In either case, diagnosis should be made by your GP who will provide a suitable treatment.

 

Q Can my children catch worms from my pet?
A Only indirectly. Worm eggs are passed out in a pet's faeces when it goes to the toilet. However, at this time, the eggs are not infective, so, as long as you clear up after your pet as soon as possible, there is no risk to you or your children from worms. However, if you leave their faeces hanging around in the garden, the eggs will have a chance to mature and become infective. Worm eggs are very tough, and can remain infective in soil for a number of years. So, if you worm your pet regularly (every 3 months) and clear up after it, you should have nothing to worry about. Make sure play sand pits are securely covered when not in use, as the neighbour's cat may also regard it as a suitable toilet.  The common type of worm that infects people (pinworm) is in no way connected to the worms that our dogs and cats carry.

 

Q Can I catch worms from my pet?
A Only indirectly. Worm eggs are passed out in a pet's faeces when it goes to the toilet. However, at this time, the eggs are not infective, so, as long as you clear up after your pet as soon as possible, there is no risk to you from worms. However, if you leave their faeces hanging around in the garden, the eggs will have a chance to mature and become infective. Worm eggs are very tough, and can remain infective in soil for a number of years. So, if you worm your pet regularly (every 3 months) and clear up after it, you should have nothing to worry about. The common type of worm that infects people (pinworm) is in no way connected to the worms that our dogs and cats carry.

 

Q What are the dangers to human health of pet worms?
A Dog and cat worms are termed "zoonoses", which means that they are transmissible to people. The most common source of infection is from contaminated soil or sand play pits. Cleaning up after dogs and cats is vital to prevent transmission of parasites to other animals and to children. When worm eggs are passed in a pet's faeces, they are initially non-infective. They need about 2 weeks in the environment to develop through to the infective stage. This means that it is not dangerous for an owner to "scoop the poop", but it is very anti-social not to. Once in a human body, the eggs hatch out and the larvae undertake a journey around the body. They can end up in the eye, causing sight impairment and sometimes blindness, in the lungs, causing asthma, and in the brain, where it is thought they may be one of the causes of poor concentration and other symptoms. Worming our pets is so easy and so inexpensive, and a proactive way to prevent all of these things from happening to our own and our neighbours' children.

 

Q Should I be worried about worms?
A You should be concerned about worming, but not worried.  Not carrying out regular worming can lead to serious health problems for your pet and may lead to expensive vet bills.  You could also be responsible for passing on a worm infection to a child. Fortunately, modern worming is low cost and easy to carry out.  Beaphar have a wide range of worming products for all ages and come in a range of dosing options for even the most awkward pets.

 

Q How often should I worm my puppy?
A Puppies should be wormed for roundworm at 2 weeks of age and then re-treated at 4,6,8,10 and 12 weeks to ensure continued freedom from worms.  Beaphar Worming Syrup is ideal for this.

 

Q How do dogs get roundworms?
A There are several species of roundworm that affect dogs. The most common type is Toxocara canis. These worms can be several inches in length, and have round bodies (very similar to a tiny earthworm, but without the segments). They are a whitish or pinkish brown colour due to ingested material. These worms are spread from dog to grass to dog. The eggs are microscopic in size and are passed in the faeces. They stick to muzzles and feet, and are ingested again by licking. Subsequently, the larvae hatch in the intestines of the dog, travel to the liver, into the bloodstream, and so enter the lungs. They are coughed up from the lungs, and are swallowed again, so reaching the intestines, where they mature into adults and start producing eggs, thus completing the cycle. The adult worms are usually noticed in puppies when they are vomited or passed in the faeces. In the adult dog, many larvae remain as harmless ‘cysts’ in the muscles, but a number reach egg-laying adulthood in the gut. In the pregnant and lactating female, when immunity is suppressed, the larvae in the cysts can become active again, infecting the puppies via the placenta before birth, and the milk after birth. In conclusion, puppies are born with worms, and dogs pick up worm eggs from the environment every day throughout their lives, ingesting these when they lick themselves.

 

Q What are the symptoms of worms?
A The symptoms can vary in their intensity. In young pups and kittens, roundworms may cause abdominal swelling and pain, loss of weight, vomiting or diarrhoea, and on rare occasions, rupture of the bowel. A post mortem may find that the stomach and intestines contain hundreds of worms. The migrating larvae in the lungs may also cause coughing. A young kitten or puppy that is thin with a ‘pot belly’ is often described as a typically ‘wormy’ puppy or kitten. In adult animals, symptoms are rarely seen, except for an occasional adult worm in faeces or vomit. Nevertheless, it is still very important to treat adults for roundworms, or they will continue to infect other pets, and possibly also children. Tapeworms consume very little food, so it is only when they are present in large quantities that they may interfere with normal digestion. Tapeworms therefore do not usually cause loss of weight. However, the presence of worms almost certainly causes some discomfort or irritation around the anus as a result of shedding segments.

 

Q I have heard that worms can make my children go blind. Is this true?
A Although dog & cat roundworms are unlikely to complete their life cycle in humans, wandering larvae can cause serious conditions in children. Ingested eggs hatch into larvae in the gut and then migrate to various organs of the body, including the liver, lungs, eyes and brain, where they can become permanently encysted. If the final resting place happens to be the retina of the eye, this can lead to sight impairment or even blindness. It is therefore of great importance to see that pets which are in contact with children are kept free from worms bt regular treatment, and that a good standard of hygiene is maintained. Faeces should be cleared away as soon as possible from gardens, litter trays, etc. Eggs in fresh faeces are not infective (they take about two weeks to develop on the grass), so you are not in danger when “scooping the poop”. Additionally, responsible dog owners always carry “poop bags” when exercising their pet, and clean away any mess, whether this be in towns or the countryside. Allowing dogs to defecate on country footpaths is no more acceptable than on town pavements.

 

Q Can people catch worms from pets?
A Certain worms are capable of being transmitted from animals to humans; such worms are said to have a ‘zoonotic potential’. The dog roundworm, Toxocara canis, is one such parasite and human infection may occur if a person swallows the microscopic worm eggs, having picked them up from contaminated soil. However, don't confuse this with the worm that many children get whilst of primary school age, which causes intensely itchy bottoms. This is a parasite called a Pin Worm or Threadworm (Enterobius vermicularis). It is transmitted between people, and has nothing whatever to do with pets.